Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies


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Using a common approach with a common language makes pupils aware of a coherent thread running through their lessons, embedding a culture of strong information skills across the school. This plan was then presented to the staff and a 6 week pilot with two S3 classes was run before Christmas. I expected them to resent having to use the online catalogues rather than use Google or Bing however they rose to the challenge and appeared to quite enjoy finding unique articles about various conditions associated with trench warfare. Describes a combined approach to delivering information literacy skills at The Open University Library.


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Outlines the aims of the newly formed Information Literacy Unit, and identifies three approaches currently used to incorporate information literacy into the curriculum. Recommends that information literacy is considered at a strategic level in the higher education sector.

Description

Parker, J. Please share your general feedback. The talk will highlight phenomena such as stigma, information avoidance, fear of missing out, serendipity and flow. The talk will conclude with a discussion of a holistic understanding of everyday information mastering, as including both cognitive, behavioural and emotional aspects. Information literacy must be considered as a fundamental competency like the ability to read, write and calculate.

Therefore, we are working on automatic learning guidance with respect to three modules of the information literacy curriculum developed by the EU DigComp 2. In prior work, we have laid out the essential research questions from a technical side. In this work, we follow-up by specifying the concept to micro learning, and micro learning content units.

Integrating information literacy into Blackboard

This is the basis for recommending suitable micro learning content, adapted to the identified competence level. The goal of the reflective question is to deepen the learning. In this paper we present the concept of the widget and its integration in a search platform. Maastricht University UM puts emphasis on analysing learning and important 21st-century skill development, such as information literacy skills.

Informed learning is a distinct way to approach information literacy in that it addresses the functional, situated and critical nature of learning to deal with information. However, we have limited insight to what extent informed learning practices occur.


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The aim of the present paper is to answer the question how we can analyse informed learning at Maastricht University. More specifically, in what way can we collect data about the link between information and the learning process to receive insights from both teachers and students?

The present paper reviews several studies, which described how to analyse information as part of the learning process. In conclusion, these are the three most important recommendations for the UM regarding analysing informed learning: 1 Analyse to what extent the functional, situated, and critical approach of informed learning are practiced with a mixed approach, 2 Quantitatively and qualitatively analyse the issues related to information use within the learning process in a student and teacher population by means of surveys, focus groups, and course syllabi.

Data can thus be collected from several perspectives e. By collecting these data, we can increase the awareness regarding information literacy as part of the learning process. In addition, these data can provide input for useful interventions to optimise information literacy education at the UM in order to provide students with one of the most essential skills for their future career. On the other hand it is strongly related to the increasing number of target groups for whom information specialists develop and realize instructions and trainings with the aim of strengthening IL.

The second dimension is a challenging task insofar as information specialists have to make themselves familiar with the particular epistemic cultures of their target groups in order to develop tailored instructions and trainings for them. How can we understand what kind of support or service a member of a specific academic discipline or social group exactly needs if we are not familiar with that discipline or group?

Understanding the information needs of someone who belongs to another epistemic culture is a challenging task which requires special knowledge and methodical expertise.

It expands the view from the traditional field of IL to an universally adoptable didactical concept which is applicable to classical IL training as well as to other instructional activities in the field of Information Science as for example the development of data literacy skills. Members of the groups are students on an educational technology course and while collaborating on a complex design problem, can be observed introducing and validating informational and technological resources to other group members, and then taking on a teaching role when it comes to helping other members use these resources most effectively.

These are practices that Wenger, White and Smith have called "stewarding", and we propose that it is in the development of their stewarding capacity that digital and information literacy practices can be seen emerging in the learners, in ways that are potentially transferable out of the HE context. Following David Harvey , we propose that the groups that work most effectively are creating "discursive maps" of their information landscapes Lloyd ; these maps are used to define and explore the context.

Whereas, groups who jump too quickly to a solution do not create an appropriate discursive map and so their digital and information literacy is more limited.

Integrating information literacy in health sciences curricula: a case study from Québec.

Identifying appropriate points at which intervention from a teacher or information. Social tagging services become valuable in contexts where users can support the enrichment, sharing and management of relevant resources. Potential benefits are the enrichment of incomplete metadata, which is crucial to offer effective retrieval services. However, user tagging skills need to be fostered if users shall effectively contribute to the idea of collaboratively sharing and creating educational resources.

Service Learning, Information Literacy, and Libraries

We aim at fostering user tagging literacy. We analysed tags and user behaviour from a German referatory for educational resources. Our results show that users apply specific tags for their learning and teaching resources that we tried to assign to additional tag categories. Based on our results, we suggest improving such services with a more user-centric approach that supports the development of user competencies on social tagging. We will contribute to a better understanding of user tagging behaviour in services focusing on educational resources.

On the one hand, this will help us to improve current services. On the other hand, we are able to build services that foster tagging literacy. This will be beneficial for users, which will be able to better manage their digital resources, and for infrastructure providers, which can apply user-generated data to improve their services.

Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies
Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies
Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies
Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies
Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies
Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies
Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies
Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies Literacy and Libraries: Learning from Case Studies

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